Wednesday, November 1, 2017

How Diabetes Affects Oral Health

THE AMERICAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION estimates that 23.1 million Americans have been diagnosed with diabetes (whether it be type 1, type 2, or gestational). At least another 7 million remain undiagnosed, and that doesn’t include the additional millions who are considered pre-diabetic. But what does diabetes have to do with oral health? Unfortunately, quite a lot.


 

Diabetes And Gum Disease

Diabetes is a chronic disease that either means the pancreas doesn’t produce insulin (type 1) or that the body doesn’t use it effectively (type 2 and gestational), both of which cause elevated blood glucose. The most serious impact elevated blood glucose has on oral health is that it simultaneously weakens the immune system and provides more food for the bacteria that attack teeth and gums.
This two-pronged attack is why 22% of diabetics also have gum disease, whether in the early stages of inflammation (gingivitis) or in the advanced stages (periodontitis) that threaten the teeth, gums, and supporting bone. The bacteria that causes gum disease can also travel through the bloodstream and make it even harder to regulate blood sugar.
 

In addition to increasing the risk of gingivitis and periodontitis, uncontrolled diabetes can also lead to a variety of other oral health problems, such as:
  • Dry mouth
  • Burning mouth syndrome
  • Impaired or slower healing
  • Increased severity and frequency of infections
  • Fungal infections
  • Salivary gland enlargement

What You Can Do

Now for the good news: even with diabetes, good oral health is within reach. Even better: keeping your teeth and gums healthy will also make the diabetes easier to manage! Make sure to brush twice a day for two minutes with a soft-bristled brush and fluoride toothpaste, floss daily or use a water flosser or interdental brush, use a non-alcoholic mouthwash, and don’t smoke. Carefully regulating your sugar intake is a major factor as well.

The Dentist’s Role

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, the standard two dental exams per year may not be enough. To stay on the safe side, we recommend that you increase the number of yearly visits to three or four. It is also crucial for us to know how you and your doctor are working together to get it under control. Likewise, your doctor needs to know how we are working with you to keep your teeth and gums healthy.

We can help you win the fight for your dental health!

Thursday, October 12, 2017

DIY Teeth Whitening Trends: Fact Or Fiction?



TRENDS IMPACT JUST about every aspect of life, from slang and fashion to which toys are collectibles this year and which fad diet everyone’s aunt is doing.
Most trends are harmless symptoms of an ever-evolving society and culture, but when they affect the ways we take care of ourselves, they can become serious. In recent years, do-it-yourself teeth whitening has been a “trendy” topic, so let’s take a look at a few of the more popular methods.

Charcoal Versus Tooth Enamel

As counterintuitive as it seems to rub black powder on your teeth and expect them to become whiter, the rationale behind the idea makes sense. Charcoal is extremely porous and absorbent, and has been used even in hospitals to safely neutralize toxins. In theory, it could do the same for your teeth.
However, charcoal isn’t just porous, it’s also abrasive. Even as it absorbs harmful compounds from your mouth and disrupts bacterial populations, it could also be scraping away your enamel, doing more harm than good. Until we know more about the effects of charcoal on teeth, it’s safer to give that home remedy a pass.

Lemon Juice: Dissolving Stains Or Dissolving Teeth?

The enamel on your teeth is the hardest substance in your body, but it is extremely susceptible to erosion by acid. Your saliva keeps the pH in your mouth balanced to protect your enamel, but any time you eat or drink something acidic, that pH is disrupted and your teeth are vulnerable. Using lemon juice on your teeth in hopes of whitening them is, therefore, likely to cause a lot of enamel erosion, and once that enamel is gone, it’s gone for good.

Oil Pulling: An Ancient Folk Remedy

Oil pulling involves swishing oil (typically coconut, sunflower, sesame, or olive oil) around in one’s mouth for up to twenty minutes. Proponents of oil pulling claim it has numerous health benefits, including teeth whitening, but the American Dental association doesn’t recommend it because there is no scientific evidence to back up these claims.

Strawberries And Bananas

Strawberries do contain some citric acid, but they also contain malic acid (particularly when ripe), which actually can give your teeth a whiter appearance. Bananas contain potassium, magnesium, and manganese, all of which promote healthier teeth and can help remove surface stains. So these two do-it-yourself teeth whiteners may actually provide some benefit! Both fruits still contain sugar, however, so you should still brush your teeth with dentist approved toothpaste after eating them.
Curious about those whitening mouthpieces that emit blue light you see all over social media? Watch the video below to learn whether or not they’re really effective:


Stick To The Science
Trends like charcoal toothpaste and lemon juice mouthwash will come and (hopefully) go, and occasionally we’ll discover remedies that do have benefits, like strawberries and bananas, but the best benefits to our teeth will always come from dentist-approved methods. Brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes and floss once a day, avoid sugary drinks and snacks, and schedule regular dental appointments.
If all of these good habits aren’t keeping your teeth white enough, talk to us about safe, professional whitening options.

Healthy smiles are beautiful smiles!

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Dentures Then And Now

AS RECENTLY AS 2012, one fifth of American adults over sixty-five had lost all of their natural teeth. Whether the tooth loss is from age or other causes, it is a problem dentists have been dealing with for thousands of years.

Dentures Have Ancient Roots

False teeth have been around in some form since at least 700 B.C., when they were made out of human or animal teeth. Tooth decay became a much bigger problem after the Industrial Revolution when refined sugar became cheap and our intake of it shot through the roof. Because more people were losing teeth, more people needed false ones, and denture technology advanced.
Easily the most famous man who needed dentures back in the day was George Washington. We’ve all heard about his wooden teeth, but they’re actually a myth. He had several sets of dentures, custom made for him from hippo ivory and human teeth, with gold wires and brass screws to hold them together.

Modern Dentures Have Come A Long Way

Today, dentures are typically made of plastics and acrylic resin, but they come in several different types, so let’s look at the main ones.

The Classic: Full Denture

When none of the natural teeth can be saved, a conventional full denture is a common choice. The denture isn’t placed in the patient’s mouth until after the gum tissues have finished healing, which can take several months.
Many people don’t like going so long without teeth, so immediate full dentures can be used in the meantime. Because the bone changes shape over the course of those months, immediate full dentures have the drawback of not always fitting very well, and they can irritate the healing gums.

Want to learn how dentures are made? Check out the video below: 

The Hybrid: Partial Denture

When at least a few of the natural teeth are still present, they serve as excellent anchors for partial dentures that replace the missing teeth. Partial dentures can be inserted and removed in much the same way as retainers. Alternatively, a permanent bridge can be installed. Partial dentures are a great option because the more of your original teeth you have, the stronger your jaw bones will be.

Going Bionic: Implant-Supported Denture

The main drawback with removable dentures is that they do little to prevent the bone loss in the jaws that occurs with tooth loss. Permanent options like dental implants, bridges, and implant-supported dentures do much better at continuing to apply the bite pressure the bone needs in order to stay strong, which preserves the shape of the face. They also make it easier to speak and chew than removable dentures, because they don’t have the risk of falling out.

Take Proper Care Of Your Dentures

All false teeth need regular cleaning to prevent discoloration and plaque buildup, whether they’re removable or permanent. They need to be brushed along with your gums, tongue, and palate. It’s important not to let them dry out, so you should store them in a denture soaking solution or even water when you’re not wearing them—just not hot water. Ultrasonic cleaners will also help keep them clean (but they don’t replace brushing).

Come See Us!

If you are considering dentures, don’t hesitate to talk to us! We can provide any information you need. It can be difficult to have confidence when you have missing teeth, but dentures can let you take charge again.

We’re here to help you love your smile again!

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Gum Recession

NO ONE LOOKS FORWARD to getting “long in the tooth” because of gum recession.
However, while tooth length might be an accurate yardstick for judging the age of a horse, age is not the culprit behind receding gums in humans. Gum recession is simply such a gradual process that it can take decades before the effects are noticeable.

Not All Gum Recession Is Avoidable

There are many contributing factors to gum recession, and some unfortunately include genetics. Some people simply have fragile gums or don’t have enough jaw bone covering the front of the roots of their teeth to support gums up to the crowns. The good news is that many of the other contributing factors can be controlled, and even if you’re predisposed to gum recession, there are ways to minimize it.

Bruxism Versus Your Gums

Chronic teeth-grinding, or bruxism, causes a whole host of problems for your oral health, and one of them is increasing your risk for gum recession. All that grinding puts too much pressure on the gums, so they begin to retreat. Bruxism can be a difficult habit to break, especially if you’re doing it in your sleep, but you can minimize the damage to the jaw bones, gums, and teeth by using a mouth guard.

 

Overbrushing Damages Gum Tissue

It might sound counterintuitive, but you can actually brush your teeth too much. Or, at least, too hard. Brushing teeth isn’t like scrubbing the grime out of tile grout; gums are not built to withstand the abrasive assault of hard-bristled brushes (and neither is the enamel on our teeth). Soft bristles are actually ideal for scrubbing away plaque and massaging the gums without damaging them. The same principle applies to flossing; you should definitely floss once a day, but go easy on those gums.

Tartar Buildup And Gum Disease

When plaque isn’t removed by brushing and flossing, it will eventually harden into tartar, which can only be removed by dental professionals. This means that the longer you go without a routine dental cleaning, the more tartar builds up along your gum lines, which puts you at risk for gum disease. Speaking of which…
In the early stages of gum disease, also called gingivitis, the health of your jaw bones is not yet at risk, which is good for avoiding gum recession. If your gums are tender, swollen, and bleed easily, it’s likely gingivitis. You can combat it with healthy brushing and flossing habits, but it’s also wise to bring the problem to us.
If untreated, gingivitis advances to become periodontitis. This is when gums start pulling away from the teeth and the integrity of the jaw bones is compromised. There are many risk factors for gum disease, including smoking, hormonal changes (like during pregnancy), diabetes, and dry mouth as a side effect of medications. At this point, better oral hygiene habits aren’t enough and professional treatment is absolutely necessary.

Help Us Help You Keep Those Gums Healthy!

If you’re worried about the structure and health of your gums, don’t hesitate to schedule an appointment with us! We can help you get your gum health back on track and discuss treatment options.

We’re rooting for you!

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

The Coolest Teeth In The Animal Kingdom


MOST OF US already know that sharks constantly grow new teeth, venomous snakes use their fangs like syringes full of poison, and elephants have enormous tusks. As lovers of teeth of all shapes and sizes, today we’d like to take a moment to spotlight a few lesser known bizarre teeth out there in the wild.

Crabeater Seals

Contrary to their name, crabeater seals’ diets consist almost entirely of antarctic krill, but you probably wouldn’t guess that by looking at their teeth. Where we have our molars, they have some very bizarre teeth. These teeth are like if a normal sharp canine tooth had many smaller canine teeth coming out of it. All together, they look like they’re packing deadly saws in their jaws.
Even though they look deadly, crabeater seals use their teeth in much the same way that we use strainers for pasta: they’ll take a big gulp of ocean water, then squeeze the water back out while their teeth trap all the tasty krill inside. Yum!

Beavers 

You’d be horrified if you woke up with orange teeth, but that’s because you aren’t a beaver. Beaver teeth become orange over time because of the iron in the food they eat. The iron makes their teeth harder, which helps them chew through trees to construct their dams. But even iron doesn’t fully protect against wear and tear, which is why their teeth constantly grow.

 

Narwhals

Narwhals are often called the unicorns of the sea because of the single spiral horn protruding up to ten feet long from the males’ heads. However, those aren’t really horns. In fact, they are tusks—in this case, elongated canine teeth that grow through the upper lip. Usually only the left one manages to grow that long, but some male narwhals end up with two full-length tusks, and occasionally a female narwhal will grow one or both as well.
As recently as May of this year, scientists still weren’t sure about the tusks’ purpose, but new footage has shown narwhals using their tusks to stun fish, making it easier to eat them. There’s probably more to it than that, though, because the tusks also contain millions of nerve endings, which likely means narwhals use them to sense their surroundings.

Keep Taking Care Of Those Chompers!

We might not be able to bop fish over the head, saw through trees, or strain krill with our ordinary human teeth, but we still need them to be healthy and strong in order to chew our food, speak clearly, and share beautiful smiles with the people we love. Always remember to brush your teeth for two minutes twice a day, floss once a day, schedule regular dental appointments, and contact us if you’re having any dental problems in between appointments!

As cool as animal teeth are, human teeth are still our favorite!


Thursday, September 7, 2017

Touch Down!

YOU CAN MAKE every appointment a touchdown as long as you’re taking good care of your teeth in the “off-season” between visits!



Monday, September 4, 2017

TOOTH ENAMEL

DID YOU KNOW that tooth enamel is the hardest substance in your entire body? Help it stay that way with good oral health habits like brushing, flossing, and regular dental visits!


TEETH AND AGING

TOOTH DECAY AND GUM DISEASE are the main culprits behind tooth loss in old age, not old age itself! Good oral hygiene will help you keep your teeth for life!


BRUXISM

BRUXISM is excessive teeth grinding or jaw clenching, and causes tooth wear and breakage, jaw disorders, and headaches! If you notice any of these side effects, come and see us!


Tuesday, August 15, 2017

HOW MUCH TIME are you spending brushing your teeth?

HOW MUCH TIME are you spending brushing your teeth? Most people stop after less than 70 seconds, even though dentists recommend brushing for 2-3 minutes!


Friday, August 11, 2017

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Easy Ways To Improve Your Dental Health

WE’VE ALL HEARD that if we want healthy teeth, we should brush twice a day, floss once a day, and schedule regular dental cleaning appointments twice a year. Definitely keep doing those things, but if you want to step up your oral health game, here are a few easy ways to do that.


Replace Your Toothbrush Regularly

One of the simplest ways you can improve your dental health and hygiene is to replace your toothbrush on a regular basis. Vigorous brushing will make the bristles fray and reduce the brush’s cleaning ability, but that’s not the only reason toothbrushes should be replaced often.
A lot of the bacteria we brush off our teeth stays on the bristles of our toothbrushes. Proper storage–meaning storing the toothbrush upright and letting it dry out between uses–can keep a toothbrush from getting smelly and nasty too fast, but it’s still important to replace your toothbrush at least every 3-4 months.

Use A Tongue-Scraper

Brushing your teeth twice daily is a no-brainer, but don’t forget your tongue! The same bacteria and gunk that flourishes on teeth can hide on your tongue too. Using a tongue scraper or just running your toothbrush over your tongue will leave your mouth feeling much fresher than if you only focus on your teeth and gums.

Don’t Brush Too Hard

Sometimes it seems like we need to really work at those teeth when we brush, to get absolutely all of the food particles and plaque out. However, if we brush too hard, we risk scraping away at the tooth enamel, which is your teeth’s first line of defense against decay. Brush gently or use a toothbrush with soft bristles to avoid damaging your teeth.

Eat Teeth-Friendly Foods

Many foods are bad for your teeth. Sugar and carbs feed the harmful bacteria living in your mouth and acidic drinks erode tooth enamel. Avoiding some of these foods will help, but there are also plenty of foods you can eat that are actually good for your teeth.
Adding more cheese, yogurt, leafy greens, apples, carrots, celery, and almonds to your diet will make your teeth happy, whether by scrubbing them as you eat, fighting bad bacteria, treating gum disease, neutralizing your mouth’s pH, or remineralizing your enamel.

We’d Love To See How Your Teeth Are Doing!

If it’s been a while since your last dental exam, we’d love to see how your teeth are doing, and we’ll be excited to see how adopting these simple habits will affect your oral health by the time we see you again!

We Love Our Patients!

Sunday, August 6, 2017

Are Elephant Tusks Teeth?


THE ANSWER IS YES! Elephant tusks are teeth, they’re just very elongated incisors. Can you imagine having front teeth like that?


Saturday, August 5, 2017

Happy Smiles Week!


OUR PATIENTS’ SMILES are our favorite part of what we do, which is why we love to celebrate Smiles Week!


Friday, August 4, 2017

Sunday, July 30, 2017

SEATTLE DENTIST DOWNTOWN

IF YOU’RE SICK OF THE WAY red wine stains your teeth, then these specially designed wine glasses might be just what you need!     http://www.nbcnews.com/


Saturday, July 29, 2017

DAIRY ISN’T THE ONLY source of calcium!

DAIRY ISN’T THE ONLY source of calcium! If you can’t have dairy, here are a few natural sources of calcium you could try instead!


Thursday, July 27, 2017

SMILE!

THE SMALLEST ACTIONS can have a huge impact, and that includes smiling! Start changing the world by sharing your smile!


Friday, May 26, 2017

Get Your Perfect Smile With Cosmetic Dental Care

Get Your Perfect Smile With Cosmetic Dental Care

Chipped or cracked teeth? No need to break the bank for a beautiful smile. Find out how cosmetic dental care and direct bonding can give you a reason to smile.

Are you embarrassed about your smile? Thinking about cosmetic dental care? You're not alone.
A recent survey by the journal Dental Economics showed cosmetic dental care accounted for 23% of general practice production. Another study by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry revealed 86% of patients who had cosmetic work done did it to look better and raise self-esteem.
Cosmetic dental care comes in a variety of forms. Whether you want to cover up any chips or cracks, replace a tooth or simply achieve a brighter smile, there are a number of procedures that can help. They don't have to cost a pretty penny, either.
Here are some cosmetic dental care procedures to help give you that perfect smile.
Whitening
Teeth whitening is one of the most common cosmetic procedures.
Depending on things we eat and drink, such as coffee, or particular habits, like smoking, teeth can become stained and discolored over time. A dentist can work on bleaching your teeth in the office or provide you with a kit to do it at home. Whitening at home may be more convenient, but you'll get results faster if you visit the dentist.
Whitening is not meant to replace cleaning and doesn't make your teeth immune to stains. It's important to maintain good oral hygiene and avoid the same things that stained your teeth in the first place.
Bonding
Bonding can fill in the spaces between teeth in order to hide gaps, chips or cracks by applying resin material directly onto your teeth. The material is shaped to your teeth to make your smile look as perfect as possible.
The procedure can often be completed in one session. Bonding can last for several years, but the material isn't as strong as natural teeth so it can be subject to wear and tear.
Veneers
Typically made from porcelain, veneers are shells that cover the front of your teeth in order to adjust the color and shape. Veneers last longer than bonding and can also look better.
Before inserting veneers, a dentist takes an impression of your teeth and buffs them before cementing the veneers in place. Porcelain veneers are made in a laboratory, so a second visit is required before they're applied.
Crowns
As the name suggests, crowns cover a tooth in order to give back it's normal shape and appearance. They can be used to fix a misshapen or broken tooth, protect a weak tooth or cover a tooth that's had another procedure performed on it.
Crowns are made of metal, resin or ceramic materials. They tend to be costly, but can have a very long lifetime if you take care of them.
Bridges
Dental bridges literally bridge the gap created by missing teeth and replace them with artificial ones. The surrounding teeth are first prepared for crowns before the false teeth are anchored to the crowns and the bridge is cemented to the prepared teeth.
Bridges can be made of metal, porcelain or a combination.
Implants
Dental implants are a more long-term solution to replacing missing teeth. Rather than being anchored to adjacent teeth, like in bridges, implants attach artificial teeth directly to the jawbone.
One implant can replace a tooth, while two or more can support the replacement of several teeth.
Show Off Those Pearly Whites
Are you thinking about getting a cosmetic dental procedure? Have you had one and would like to share your experience?
Comment below!


Sunday, May 21, 2017

5 Reasons You Need to Schedule a Dental Check-Up


5 Reasons You Need to Schedule a Dental Check-Up

Having your teeth cleaned regularly has a lot of benefits. We're giving you 5 reasons to schedule your dental check-up now.

Life can sometimes get in the way of our plans.
Yet, one thing we should never miss is a dental exam.
It's important to book an appointment every six months to preserve your smile and care for your teeth.
Here are five reasons why you need to schedule a dental check-up.

1. Tooth Decay
Billions of people across the world are suffering from untreated dental problems.
Tooth decay is one of the most prevalent diseases people experience.
The issue can occur when plaque combines with starches and sugars to produce an acid.
This acid attacks tooth enamel, which can lead to the loss of a tooth.
The best way to prevent tooth decay is by brushing your teeth and flossing twice per day.
It's also essential to attend regular checkups. A dentist can prevent a tooth extraction caused by decay.
2. Oral Cancer
Did you know that 132 individuals receive a mouth cancer diagnosis every day?
Tragically, one person per hour will die of oral cancer every day.
The good news is, oral cancers have a survival rate of between 80-90%. Yet, most mouth cancers are found as late-stage cancers, which can reduce the survival rate.
The disease is often curable if diagnosed in the early stages. That's why it's important to regularly attend a dental exam.
It could save your life.
3. Save Money
You might not like the thought of paying for a dental exam, but it could save you a considerable amount of money.
By staying on top of your oral hygiene, you can prevent the development of serious dental issues.
Dental cleanings and exams can prevent costly tooth extractions, dental implants or root canals.
If you want to care for your teeth and save money, book a dental appointment today.
4. Your Dream Smile
Everyone can achieve the perfect smile.
If you're unhappy with your teeth, a dentist can review your smile in a dental check-up to identify the next steps.
There are many technologies and developments to help you achieve straight, white teeth.
A dentist may recommend teeth whitening, orthodontics, veneers and more.
5. Avoid a Toothache with a Dental Check-Up
Nothing is more annoying (and painful) than a toothache.
This troublesome throb can affect your whole body and mood.
To avoid a toothache or a dental emergency, schedule routine dental exams.
It can prevent emergencies from happening in the first place. What's more, your dentist will be more familiar with your dental history.
Don't ignore your oral health until it's too late to book a dental check-up, because you might regret it.
Conclusion
Different people will experience different dental issues.
The best way to prevent any problems is by scheduling regular dental appointments.
A dentist can provide oral hygiene advice to help you maintain a healthy, beautiful smile. What's more, they can stop any issues in their tracks, which can improve your dental and general health.
Do you want to book a dental check-up with a trusted practice? Visit our website today.


Thursday, May 18, 2017

ZOOM WHITENING $50 DOLLAR REBATE!


5 Reasons You Need to Schedule a Dental Check-Up


5 Reasons You Need to Schedule a Dental Check-Up

Having your teeth cleaned regularly has a lot of benefits. We're giving you 5 reasons to schedule your dental check-up now.
Life can sometimes get in the way of our plans.
Yet, one thing we should never miss is a dental exam.
It's important to book an appointment every six months to preserve your smile and care for your teeth.
Here are five reasons why you need to schedule a dental check-up.
1. Tooth Decay
Billions of people across the world are suffering from untreated dental problems.
Tooth decay is one of the most prevalent diseases people experience.
The issue can occur when plaque combines with starches and sugars to produce an acid.
This acid attacks tooth enamel, which can lead to the loss of a tooth.
The best way to prevent tooth decay is by brushing your teeth and flossing twice per day.
It's also essential to attend regular checkups. A dentist can prevent a tooth extraction caused by decay.
2. Oral Cancer
Did you know that 132 individuals receive a mouth cancer diagnosis every day?
Tragically, one person per hour will die of oral cancer every day.
The good news is, oral cancers have a survival rate of between 80-90%. Yet, most mouth cancers are found as late-stage cancers, which can reduce the survival rate.
The disease is often curable if diagnosed in the early stages. That's why it's important to regularly attend a dental exam.
It could save your life.
3. Save Money
You might not like the thought of paying for a dental exam, but it could save you a considerable amount of money.
By staying on top of your oral hygiene, you can prevent the development of serious dental issues.
Dental cleanings and exams can prevent costly tooth extractions, dental implants or root canals.
If you want to care for your teeth and save money, book a dental appointment today.
4. Your Dream Smile
Everyone can achieve the perfect smile.
If you're unhappy with your teeth, a dentist can review your smile in a dental check-up to identify the next steps.
There are many technologies and developments to help you achieve straight, white teeth.
A dentist may recommend teeth whitening, orthodontics, veneers and more.
5. Avoid a Toothache with a Dental Check-Up
Nothing is more annoying (and painful) than a toothache.
This troublesome throb can affect your whole body and mood.
To avoid a toothache or a dental emergency, schedule routine dental exams.
It can prevent emergencies from happening in the first place. What's more, your dentist will be more familiar with your dental history.
Don't ignore your oral health until it's too late to book a dental check-up, because you might regret it.
Conclusion
Different people will experience different dental issues.
The best way to prevent any problems is by scheduling regular dental appointments.
A dentist can provide oral hygiene advice to help you maintain a healthy, beautiful smile. What's more, they can stop any issues in their tracks, which can improve your dental and general health.
Do you want to book a dental check-up with a trusted practice? Visit our website today.


Friday, May 5, 2017

How Zoom Teeth Whitening Can Change Your Life

Zoom Teeth Whitening is the secret to confidence. We'll show you why.

Once reserved for Hollywood starlets, more and more people are looking for that perfect set of ultra-pearly whites to show off. 
For good reason, too, since a bright white smile reportedly leads to an increased success rate in your career and your love life. 
But with the wide range of products on the market, how do you choose the best teeth whitening option for you?
Read on to find out why Zoom teeth whitening is the right choice for a winning smile.

How Do Teeth Whitening Treatments Work?

Why Do Teeth Turn Yellow in the First Place?
Unfortunately, everyone's smile will grow a bit duller over time. 
That's thanks to stains on the hard outer covering on your teeth, called enamel. Enamel is susceptible to discoloration from certain dietary choices, like coffee and red wine.  
Particularly acidic foods can make that effect worse by damaging enamel, making it easier for colorful foods to stick to it. 
Even if you avoid those, the inside of your tooth can show discoloration. 
Called dentin, your inner tooth can turn yellow thanks to certain medications and even too much fluoride in your drinking water. 
As long as you're getting regular dental cleanings, that yellow color is probably harmless. But if you're aiming for a white smile, you have some different teeth whitening systems to choose from.

What Are Your Options?
Whitening systems come in a variety of formats, each of which works in a somewhat different manner. 
Whitening toothpastes, for instance, contain mild abrasives—or small, scrubbing materials—to scrape surface stains off of your enamel. 
Tooth whiteners, on the other hand, contain a chemical like peroxide to lighten your teeth more dramatically. 
They may come in the form of a tray or adhesive strip, but the general idea is to keep the whitening agent in contact with your teeth for a prolonged period of time. 
Thanks to that extra exposure, those systems are usually more effective at whitening your teeth than a toothpaste or a rinse.
In-office whitening, however, generates the best results for a truly white smile. 
That's because trained professionals apply whitening compounds that are too strong to sell over the counter.
They require a trained hand to apply, but they get better results. 

What Is Zoom Teeth Whitening?
Zoom Teeth Whitening is a professional, in-office teeth whitening method designed to work fast. 
It's an innovative system that uses an LED light in conjunction with a whitening compound to quickly and effectively brighten your smile.
It's gaining popularity with dentists nationwide and is currently used by over 10 million people

Why Choose Zoom Teeth Whitening?
Since it's completed professionally in a dentist's office, the Zoom system is more likely to be effective at whitening your smile, and it's versatile enough to work if you have implants.  
Keep in mind, this procedure may lead to temporary tooth sensitivity after it's complete. Talk with your dentist for information on how to mitigate any discomfort after your procedure. 
But if you're looking for a fast-acting way to bring your smile up a few shades, try Zoom teeth whitening. 
For more information on Zoom teeth whitening, contact Sound Dentistry Seattle today.